Tag: blockchain

7 Healthcare Technology Trends Every Practice Owner Needs to Keep an Eye On

Over the last few years, hospitals and healthcare practices throughout the country have started adopting new technology that helps them provide better care to their patients and make life easier for their employees.

For example, 64 percent of physicians now send electronic messages to their patients via text or email. Meanwhile, 63 percent allow their patients to view their medical records online.

Are you looking for new ways to bring your practice into the 21st Century? Listed below are seven of the top healthcare technology trends you ought to know about and consider implementing in your practice.

  1. Electronic Medical Records

Electronic medical records (or EMR for short) are one of the most popular tech trends in the healthcare world.

Lots of practices have started using EMR to simplify the process of searching for patient records. EMR has also made it easier for patients to access their medical records online.

Even though plenty of practices are making use of EMR, there are still a lot of them that haven’t made the switch yet. The sooner you start making your files available in a digital format, the sooner you’ll start reaping all the benefits of EMR.

For example, EMR provides immediate access to patient records. It also helps physicians make better decisions about their patient’s care.

They can spot patterns more easily when everything is in front of them. This, in turn, allows them to choose the best treatment approach and avoid missing something important.

  1. Blockchain Technology

Blockchain has started to make its way into the healthcare world, and it’s not showing any signs of leaving.

Blockchain technology allows healthcare practices (and other businesses, for that matter) to store digital information without taking up a ton of space. It also allows them to store their information in a more secure way since it cannot be copied.

In the digital age, patient security and privacy protection are of the utmost importance to many healthcare professionals.

Blockchain systems allow practice owners and managers to ensure they’re keeping patient records and information safe. It also helps them to avoid expensive and harmful (on many levels) data breaches.

  1. Telemedicine

In 2019, many people are looking for new ways to get things done without leaving their homes. They have groceries delivered to their door, for example, and they communicate with friends and family via video chat.

Lots of healthcare practices are jumping in on this trend and are making it easier for patients to have their medical needs met from the comfort of their own homes as well.

Telemedicine allows patients to talk to doctors, receive medical advice, and even have prescriptions filled, without having to make a special trip to the doctor’s office.

Physicians are also using these same technologies to communicate with each other in more effective ways and come up with better, more comprehensive solutions for their patients.

  1. Artificial Intelligence

Artificial intelligence is for way more than gaming. It’s also one of the biggest healthcare trends of 2019.

Physicians and researchers have started or have plans to start using artificial intelligence in a variety of ways.

As artificial intelligence technology becomes more refined, it will be easier for healthcare professionals to monitor their patients and provide better diagnosis and treatment.

It will also likely enhance the telemedicine world as well, as it will make it easier for physicians to see their patients without having to be in the same physical location as them.

  1. Wearables

Wearable health monitoring devices are not new. However, they’ve become more popular than ever, and they’re also becoming more advanced.

As these devices become more accurate and able to provide more details about the wearer’s health, it’s likely that many physicians will start relying on them to gather information about their patient’s health and daily habits.

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Blockchain: Increasing Security In Telehealth

By Blaise Wabo, associate director, A-LIGN.

Blaise Wabo
Blaise Wabo

As technology continues to improve, using virtual connections in place of face-to-face meetings has surged in popularity. The healthcare industry is no different – the telehealth industry is predicted to be worth more than $130 billion by 2025. While telehealth offers many benefits to patients, particularly those who are unable to leave their homes, the technology raises several serious security concerns.

These problems primarily stem from the lack of security controls when it comes to the collection and sharing of data. During a conversation between a patient and doctor, for example, sensitive, personal patient data is often shared. When the connection between patient and doctor is virtual, it is possible that an unsecured connection could be interrupted, and patient data leaked. Home telehealth devices and sensors may also collect data that a patient would prefer to keep private, including times that the home is unoccupied. If devices are storing and transmitting this data, it is possible that it could be accessed by third parties.

These concerns have left a lingering question: how can patients still reap the benefits of telehealth while ensuring their connections and data remain secure? The answer may lie in another technology that healthcare providers have only started to adopt – blockchain.

Enabling Secure Data

Blockchain at its most basic level simply enables secure, immutable and anonymous transactions, allowing cross-network communications to take place through mutually agreed upon interactions between parties. For healthcare providers, this opens up an efficient means of transferring data and communicating between different organizations that handle patient data. Medical records can also be stored using blockchain, allowing providers to create a more complete patient history by keeping larger amounts of data and information securely encrypted in fragmented systems.

The ability to securely share data and control who has access to it will surely help to increase consumer confidence when it comes to telehealth. Blockchain requires that data is approved by both the patient and doctor before it is entered into a computer.  The data must also be verified against a previous ledger, so no single party ever has total control. This ensures multiple checks are in place and reduces the chance that an unauthorized party could access sensitive patient data, which is one of the main concerns when it comes to using telehealth.

Regulating Sensitive Communications

While it offers many solutions, federal organizations have not officially decided how regulations would apply to blockchain, including the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA). HIPAA outlines rules for ensuring the privacy and security of patient data, as well as the secure transfer of data, but it does not apply to patients; ensuring blockchain users remain compliant will be the responsibility of healthcare providers.

HIPPA guidelines for telehealth require that healthcare organizations communicate electronically protected health information (ePHI) through regulated channels to ensure security. This means that tools like Skype or unencrypted email cannot be used to communicate ePHI, limiting what could be used for cost-effective telehealth.

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Why Blockchain Tech May Be Key To Protecting Patient Records

By Adrian Johansen, freelance writer; @AdrianJohanse18.

While cybersecurity is an issue constantly addressed by the media and something small and large businesses alike are consistently focusing on, one of the biggest digital dilemmas comes from the healthcare system. This may be unsurprising, given that financial records and personal data are all stored within patient care files. Hackers are fully aware of the value of this data, and it’s about time that the medical industry shows that it does as well.

Sadly, one in four consumers have had their healthcare data breached. This calls for swift action by the players in the field. Some experts think that the answer can be found in blockchain. That’s right — the same technology that secures Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies could soon become the key to protecting patient records.

While there have been ongoing discussion among government and finance officials about the actual risks of cryptocurrency, it’s generally agreed upon by tech experts that blockchain is one of the most secure ways to go. Will the world see this technology implemented into its healthcare systems soon, though? It’s very possible that the answer is “yes.”

The Security of Blockchain Makes It the Best Ledger for Healthcare Networks

The reason that blockchain technology a regular part of public discussion and being normalized in new industries so frequently is its transparency and security measures. It’s garnered public, private, criminal, and government interest due to this, and it’s doubtful that its popularity will stop anytime soon. But what is it about the ledger that makes it so safe?

Primarily, it’s the unique approach it takes to security keys. There wouldn’t be a way for someone to modify or corrupt information within a blockchain system without the relevant key. At one point it was even believed that the technology was unhackable.

While there is still debate over what it means to hack blockchain networks and whether or not it’s even been done, that debate still points to the safety of those networks at large. Without a doubt, it is the most secure ledger for protecting personal data — and hospitals may need it the most.

Making It Official

The lengths at which blockchain is being adapted cannot be understated. Government officials are starting to explore the technology, and the big four investment firms are even beginning to pay attention to it. But what does this mean for the healthcare industry?

Well right now, blockchain still is not the norm. Currently, if a hospital or healthcare organization wants to adopt it, they are probably making the best move in terms of security.

While there are downsides to this kind of mass adoption (discussed at further length below), it also calls for advancements to be made, which could better these systems as a whole. It should be noted that with something as new as blockchain technology hitting the greater market, there are a lot of changes bound to happen that cannot be accurately predicted right now.

The Adaptation of Blockchain in Culture May Challenge Security

Granted, it is very important to recognize that blockchain’s mass acceptance could adulterate the technology. With businesses at large implementing it into their operations and the parallel use of mobile money tools in modern society, people are going to start looking for loopholes. Hackers are going to make it their duty to try and disrupt it.

For this reason, there needs to be external precautions set up for security. A good example is business insurance — something necessary for every hospital, even with blockchain implementation. The loss of mass amounts of data is bound to occur, so hospitals need to be protected, even when their systems seem foolproof.

Right now, hospitals and organizations at large need to understand that blockchain is a very important technology to the future of healthcare. But it cannot be solely depended on, either. Other precautions need to be taken to protect patient data by the healthcare industry. Blockchain may be the best option healthcare networks have for data security.

How do you think blockchain will change, for better or worse? Do you think this will heavily affect the healthcare industry? Feel free to share your opinion in the replies below!

Former PayPal CTO’s New Company, Global Care, Introduces Deep Learning Healthcare Analytics

Global Care Administrators announced that its deep learning health intelligence platform will go to market under the name Global Care Analytics (GCANA). According to company president, Scott Guilfoyle, the platform gives healthcare management a tool for key management insights within claims-and-cost and clinical data, and solid predictive analytics from local and/or global data via the desktop. 

Scott Guilfoyle

“Global Care gives the C-suite of health systems, hospitals, and medical groups the power to conduct deep analytics, and predictive analytics, of their data. The CEO, COO, or CFO can execute precisely targeted, complex queries on massive data sets with real-time or near-real-time responses by dragging and dropping preset queries into the engine,” says Guilfoyle. “We have a patented hyper-ingestion engine that can take in a million datasets a minute, which is amazingly fast and accurate. Then our hyper-digestion process uses neural networks to analyze the oceans of data, and become more and more accurate as it learns to refine its ability to make connections.” 

Guilfoyle, the former CTO of PayPal, and CIO of LendingTree,Bank of America Card Services, and GE’s Aircraft Engine Services, Aircraft Engines eBusiness, and Plastics Americas, believes the company’s deep analytics platform gives healthcare executives access to billions of data points for better organizational management, delivery of care, and population health. “Plus, there is enormous value in access to our global health data exchange. Each time we onboard a new client, and each time any and all clients query the platform, the ocean of collected health data in our exchange grows larger, and our platform grows more knowledgeable and more accurate.”

Global Care was founded by former senior healthcare executives who all, according to CEO Kevin Sullivan, “Understand the enormous value of the data trapped within a healthcare organization. This is the intelligence engine I wish I’d had in my former senior operations positions. The value of deep analytics will radically transform day-to-day healthcare management for the better. When executive management has desktop power to identify gaps in care or delivery of care services, outcome metrics, and the most complete real-time picture of the health of their patient populations, they can speed up more knowledgeable decision making. Speed, precision, deep knowledge, and agility through predictive analytics are tools they can use to radically change their landscape.” 

Guilfoyle says the analytics technology will be followed by what most healthcare management think of as “unobtainium:” A frictionless transaction (billing-claims-reimbursement) systemthat authenticates the patient, authorizes the procedure, files the claim with the payor, and reimburses the provider in real-time as care is delivered. Imagine providers being paid before the patient leaves the facility.”

He says company’s Global Care Pay technology could help eliminate some of the $147bn – $510bn of waste in administrative complexities and manual transactions. “Global Care Pay applies smart contracts and blockchain technology to make the transaction frictionless, immediate, highly accurate, and secure. It’s our next big step and one we’re really excited to bring to market in the near future.”

Sullivan says the two-year-old, privately-held company is raising capital, and it plans to build out the pay system on the foundational success of the analytics platform. “We’re way out front on blockchain pay technology, and our work with clients on deep learning analytics gives us the kind of real-world environment we need to fine-tune the Global Care Pay for a soft release in the next 12-14 months.”

Use Cases and Opportunities of Blockchain In Healthcare

By Maria Redka, technology writer, MLSDev.

Maria Redka

Blockchain offers countless opportunities for growth and development of many industries. Sectors like finance, banking, government and public services, education and commerce have already taken the first steps at embracing this revolutionary technology.

One of the industries blockchain can change beyond recognition is healthcare. In this post, we will cover the opportunities blockchain offers for the healthcare sector, and the present use cases of blockchain in healthcare.

Why does healthcare need blockchain?

Healthcare industry has a lot of issues on a local, national and global levels. It has been struggling with data collection, storage, and transfer problems for a long time now. Federal regulations and rules make all the healthcare procedures lengthy and tedious. The current healthcare system does not manage patient data well. Pretty often it happens so that one patient cannot gather all of their medical records in one place and in one format quickly, or cannot gather the needed information at all.

Unfortunately, critical patient information is in most cases scattered across different healthcare institutions in different formats. What makes it even harder for healthcare providers and patients is that data management systems and security regulations often vary across different institutions and states. What’s even worse, many medical records have mistakes in them, and the outdated data management systems cannot trace and fix these mistakes. It all boils down to this: in extreme situations and in time of urgent need, it is practically impossible to access all the needed patient information easily, quickly and securely.

What can blockchain do here? With the help of this innovative technology, healthcare providers will be able to facilitate their data management processes beyond recognition. Blockchain can help healthcare providers collect, exchange, analyze and secure medical records seamlessly. It will give doctors and patients an opportunity to access any needed patient data from anywhere without tolerating the privacy or security of any party.

Can blockchain be a panacea for the healthcare industry? One thing is for sure — this technology can help the healthcare system improve healthcare services greatly without rising the costs of the corresponding processes significantly.

Blockchain and patient data handling

Blockchain can help the healthcare sector solve the issue with patient data storage. Potentially, it can cancel all the cultural, geographical, political and religious limitations that interfere with patient data handling nowadays. When the patient data is stored in the blockchain, it can be processed, managed and transferred seamlessly and securely. It means that in times of greatest need and urgency all the required data will be there to save a life.

MedRec, an Ethereum-based system, is one of the first blockchain-powered solutions that aim at facilitating patient data management. MedRec makes it easy for patients and doctors to view and manage patient data securely.

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Central and Southern Ohio HIMSS Announces Spring Conference 2019

The Central and Southern Ohio chapter of the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (CSO HIMSS) announced its Spring conference titled “AI, Blockchain and Care: The Future ABC’s of Healthcare” will be held on Friday, May 10, 2019, at the Conference Center at OCLC, 6600 Kilgour Place, Dublin, Ohio.

The conference will open with a welcome from the CSO HIMSS program hair, Caitlin Graham, CSO HIMSS president, Ajay Sharma, and will include a presentation of Scholarship Awards to recipients Shreya Patel from Ohio State University and Melissa Schulte from Miami University. The conference will feature keynote addresses from Dr. Tina Moen, chief pharmacy officer of IBM Watson Health and Ed Marx, CIO, the Cleveland Clinic.

The conference will conclude with a blockchain panel discussion with two members from the HIMSS National Blockchain Task Force on the panel topic “ABC’s of Healthcare with blockchain. The Reality Today and how to make it work for you tomorrow.”

Ajay Sharma, president of CSO HIMSS said, “The CSO HIMSS Chapter likes to be at the forefront of educating our members with relevant trends for the healthcare IT ecosystem. AI and Blockchain are both areas that are being talked about in a healthcare provider setting due to clinicians being inundated with data. With cloud adoption, storage discussions start in the Petabytes. We are sure that in the not too distant future, the concept of ‘only Petabytes’ may sound quaint. AI provides hope to many in IT to tame that data challenge and be able to provide faster and more efficient care for our patient populations.”

In addition to the educational aspect of the event, there’s also the opportunity network with other attendees and innovative sponsors. Sponsors include Cisco, IBM, AHEAD and Box, Commvault, Nutanix, Path Forward IT, Zones Healthcare IT Solutions and Covermymeds.

Interested participants can register for the conference at http://csohio.himsschapter.org/event/cso-himss-annual-spring-conference

Additional information is available on the CSO HIMSS website at http://csohio.himsschapter.org/ and via social media on Twitter at https://twitter.com/CSOHIMSS and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/Csohimss.

Augusta HiTech’s Blockchain EMR Solution Allows Sharing Between Patients and EMS

Image result for Augusta HiTech logoAugusta HiTech announces the launch of One Med Chart, the first blockchain-powered patient-controlled electronic medical records (EMR) platform bringing real-time EMR sharing between patients and emergency medical services (EMS). One Med Chart is a user-driven universal medical record and health information repository designed to give individuals the ability to monitor, improve, and keep track of their health through a user-friendly wellness app.

“People don’t have a single location to view, manage, and share their health information. However, now, through our development of One Med Chart, health information is available at our fingertips, giving users ultimate control of who accesses their health information,” said Guillermo Vargas, One Med Chart Co-founder and CEO. “With One Med Chart’s goal of minimizing unnecessary health risks based on lack of medical information, having an application to request and keep track of appointments with an individual’s medical records attached mitigates such risk. Convenience is a bonus.”

One Med Chart’s wellness app offers individuals a simple way to add important preventive and holistic medical information as well as health information, such as health records and current medications or treatment regimens, straight to their mobile devices for immediate access by care providers, physicians, and emergency personnel.

Wellness app safeguards sensitive information

Augusta HiTech, with the full support of One Med Chart, is essential to the continuous development of One Med Chart’s AI and blockchain-based web application to keep an individual’s sensitive information safe.

While making it easier and intuitive for users to view their medical documents, book medical appointments, send messages and emails to external users, track medications, measure fitness goals of regimens and workouts, or add a QR code snapshot of their medical history for use in case of an emergency.

Augusta HiTech’s Hyperledger Smart Blockchain keeps One Med Chart’s user’s medical records protected through multi-factor authentication and various levels of encryption, so only users can view their One Med Chart Health Information (OMCHI), or share their medical records and workout regimens in real-time.

The wellness app connects to smart devices and gives users the freedom of sharing their medical records through the secure application or sending it securely through e-mail.

Patients can receive their medical records from their doctors through fax, e-mail, directly from an electronic medical records system, or upload documents directly to One Med Chart.

Sean Caputo

“Our blockchain solution for One Med Chart is designed to give patients a more significant stake in managing their healthcare and to prevent unnecessary deaths from lack of information while providing a measurable impact on cost-effectiveness in hospital settings,” said Sean Caputo, chief strategy officer at Augusta HiTech.

Caputo said that One Med Chart’s blockchain was designed to accurately store data and eliminate the need to track down a patient’s previous medical records, which helps save lives.

“Hospital staff can quickly log into the health record system for an individual at an emergency room to learn about their past medical history,” he said.

One Med Chart Wellness App Features

Snapshot
Users print their Snapshot, which is a QR Code containing health information needed in case of an emergency, and they can carry the Snapshot in a wallet or purse with other cards.

Users choose what information to share with the public and what information to share with medical personnel. Only authorized/certified EMS personnel have access to the One Med Chart EMS app, which is required to view a patient’s private Snapshot.

Document Manager
The Document Manager accepts medical records in various formats catering to the needs of those who need it most. One Med Chart allows patients to control their records by allowing controlled access and length of time (time bombs) to view information.

My Health
My Health allows a person to create regimens and workouts to track daily calories lost, daily steps taken, and medications. Inside My Health, users also have Fitness Cards: Heal, Stamina and Olympian.

Heal, allows a patient to create a workout regimen based on a doctor’s plan. Stamina is for people who work out, want to keep track of their workouts and share their workouts with others. Olympian is for record breakers and the physically elite. This information is the only portion of One Med Chart shared publicly.

Fit Center
Fit Center connects smart devices and fitness platforms, such as Apple Health, Google Fit, Fitbit and iHealth.

“One Med Chart is using technology to ensure secure universal access to medical records while promoting a healthy lifestyle,” said Guillermo Vargas. “Simply put, a few minutes of uploading medical records could save someone’s life, and tracking workouts can improve a person’s life expectancy.”

Best Health Technologies In 2019 That Executives Should Look Into

By Harry Conley, health writer, LuckyAssignments.com and GumEssays.com.

Harry B. Conley

Healthcare technology is advancing quickly and this is precisely why executives need to be aware of all new technologies that can make their healthcare organisation more efficient and more impactful. This may seem difficult – staying on top of things and implementing new technologies always is, but it brings immense benefits and great results. While many technology advancements come with all that fame that is often not necessary, it can make patient satisfaction better. It can also improve cost savings and this is really important for the future of your organisation.

So, in this spirit, here are some of the most amazing tech advancements that can help your healthcare organisation become better and take another step towards the future.

Blockchain

Blockchain can make interoperability ai reality. You can solve many problems between healthcare organisations and it’s a solution that healthcare industry has been looking for for many years. It can decentralize the record systems and have multiple locations that can be shared with more stakeholders. This will help the healthcare system immensely and it can operate within different stakeholders in the healthcare systems. Instead of having a single client database, you can include both clinical and financial data on one server and in an independent, transparent database.

“Blockchain technology can share data in a safe system and put the clients and their needs at the center of the attention. Still, healthcare industry is a decade away from implementing blockchain in a meaningful way,”says Ingrid Fulton, a tech editor at Draft beyond and ResearchPapersUK.

Artificial intelligence

Artificial intelligence can help with better oncology. Veterans Affairs is helping with this as a part of their precision oncology program which supports patients that have stage 4 cancer and that have tried all other methods of getting better. They are using AI to help use cancer data in the treatment of these patients. They are also veteran.

They treat more than 3.5 percent of patients in the US and this is the largest group of patients with cancer within any healthcare groups. This includes veterans from rural areas where it has been hard for them to implement better technology, especially something of this value.

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Technology Trends In Healthcare In 2019

Doctor Pointing at Tablet LaptopThanks to the advent of technologies, we can witness irreversible changes in our daily life today. It is now easier to cope with our everyday routine because we have smart solutions that speed up the pace of our life and make it more convenient.

Healthcare is where technologies are expected to revolutionize treatment and research methods we are used to so much. Hence, we have prepared some technological trends that will make healthcare more advanced in 2019.

The Internet of Medical Things

The notion of The Internet of Medical Things (IoMT) is tightly connected with wearables. This technology is designed to transmit the patient’s data through various sensors and gadgets attached to the patient’s clothes or directly to their body. Fitness trackers and smart sensors are specifically elaborated to measure blood pressure, glucose level, pulse, heart rate, etc. Along with that, you can count calories you’ve burned, and miles walked.

Well, it doesn’t sound that innovative in 2019. But what makes it one of the most progressive trends is that the gathered data can be used in many various and innovative ways. For example, preventive medicine can benefit a lot with the help of IoMT. Research gets more accurate and timely, and it is even possible to prevent epidemics using the stats gathered in this way.

Anyway, if this is your college topic and you need thorough research of the field, you can consider getting case study help by ordering your paper online to ensure the highest quality and most accurate statistics.

Telehealth

Well … yes, consulting a doctor through your telly looks like a scene from one of those futuristic novels showing what the world would look like in the 21st century. In fact, it is what we have now. Modern technologies allow us to forget about hours spent in a clinic waiting for your doctor to invite you. That also includes waiting for the results of your tests.

Now you can consult any doctor in the world having a computer and an Internet connection. Imagine that you needed to see a reputable specialist in another country. It would be highly inconvenient to go all the way there just for a consultation. Firstly, you’d have to spend a lot of time. Secondly, you might need help to move around. And finally, it would be costly.

Today, you can contact your doctor from any spot in the world and get their consultation. It will not work in emergency cases, but it can work well if you need help with urgent but small issues. This is a good possibility for those who reside in far rural areas or require a highly specialized doctor to receive timely medical assistance.

The technology can also allow people to get consulted more frequently, which will improve the overall health of the population and establish better relations with doctors.

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Cutting Through The Hype: The State Of Blockchain In Healthcare

By Ben Flock, chief healthcare strategist, TEKsystems.

Ben Flock

Healthcare professionals know that blockchain is coming, but there is still some apprehension associated with the technology. The cryptocurrency industry first pioneered this technology and its results have been highly impressive. But when it comes to the healthcare industry, there is a lack of proven use cases, leading to a delay in blockchain’s widespread adoption.

To pull back the curtain on the reluctance to adopt blockchain technology, TEKsystems partnered with HIMSS Analytics to host a focus group of business and technology leaders from the payer, provider, pharma and public sector. The goal: to better understand customer needs and business challenges when it comes to actually implementing blockchain.

Findings revealed that, as most in the industry already know or suspect, there is a limited overall understanding of blockchain technology. However, it seems that this limited knowledge is the foundation for most of the apprehension toward widely adopting the technology. Additional roadblocks that contribute to this apprehension include the lack of impactful use cases, fears of what the unspecified governance of data could mean for compliance, security concerns and industry politics, among others.

There is good news—those who have a basic understanding of blockchain exhibit less apprehension and a more cautious exuberance toward adoption of the technology. As understanding of blockchain grows and more practical examples of its benefits are found, the healthcare industry will become more open to implementing blockchain solutions.

During the focus group, participants discussed proven use cases for blockchain that could be used as industry examples to help increase the general understanding of blockchain technology. The group identified three main use cases that could be implemented in the near term after a short testing period: provider directory updates, expediting the provider credentialing process and prior authorization.

A provider directory was the first use case identified by the focus group. Insurance companies must provide patients with timely, accurate provider contact information and new patient availability. While Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) regulate provider directory services, many of them are inefficient, costly and often laden with manual processes. With blockchain, the provider ledger could be maintained through a proactive, structured, perpetual process enabling open and direct access to provider information on an as-needed basis. Because provider directory information is already public record, it’s a high-result, low-risk proof-of-concept project.

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