Tag: electronic medical records

Augusta HiTech’s Blockchain EMR Solution Allows Sharing Between Patients and EMS

Image result for Augusta HiTech logoAugusta HiTech announces the launch of One Med Chart, the first blockchain-powered patient-controlled electronic medical records (EMR) platform bringing real-time EMR sharing between patients and emergency medical services (EMS). One Med Chart is a user-driven universal medical record and health information repository designed to give individuals the ability to monitor, improve, and keep track of their health through a user-friendly wellness app.

“People don’t have a single location to view, manage, and share their health information. However, now, through our development of One Med Chart, health information is available at our fingertips, giving users ultimate control of who accesses their health information,” said Guillermo Vargas, One Med Chart Co-founder and CEO. “With One Med Chart’s goal of minimizing unnecessary health risks based on lack of medical information, having an application to request and keep track of appointments with an individual’s medical records attached mitigates such risk. Convenience is a bonus.”

One Med Chart’s wellness app offers individuals a simple way to add important preventive and holistic medical information as well as health information, such as health records and current medications or treatment regimens, straight to their mobile devices for immediate access by care providers, physicians, and emergency personnel.

Wellness app safeguards sensitive information

Augusta HiTech, with the full support of One Med Chart, is essential to the continuous development of One Med Chart’s AI and blockchain-based web application to keep an individual’s sensitive information safe.

While making it easier and intuitive for users to view their medical documents, book medical appointments, send messages and emails to external users, track medications, measure fitness goals of regimens and workouts, or add a QR code snapshot of their medical history for use in case of an emergency.

Augusta HiTech’s Hyperledger Smart Blockchain keeps One Med Chart’s user’s medical records protected through multi-factor authentication and various levels of encryption, so only users can view their One Med Chart Health Information (OMCHI), or share their medical records and workout regimens in real-time.

The wellness app connects to smart devices and gives users the freedom of sharing their medical records through the secure application or sending it securely through e-mail.

Patients can receive their medical records from their doctors through fax, e-mail, directly from an electronic medical records system, or upload documents directly to One Med Chart.

Sean Caputo

“Our blockchain solution for One Med Chart is designed to give patients a more significant stake in managing their healthcare and to prevent unnecessary deaths from lack of information while providing a measurable impact on cost-effectiveness in hospital settings,” said Sean Caputo, chief strategy officer at Augusta HiTech.

Caputo said that One Med Chart’s blockchain was designed to accurately store data and eliminate the need to track down a patient’s previous medical records, which helps save lives.

“Hospital staff can quickly log into the health record system for an individual at an emergency room to learn about their past medical history,” he said.

One Med Chart Wellness App Features

Snapshot
Users print their Snapshot, which is a QR Code containing health information needed in case of an emergency, and they can carry the Snapshot in a wallet or purse with other cards.

Users choose what information to share with the public and what information to share with medical personnel. Only authorized/certified EMS personnel have access to the One Med Chart EMS app, which is required to view a patient’s private Snapshot.

Document Manager
The Document Manager accepts medical records in various formats catering to the needs of those who need it most. One Med Chart allows patients to control their records by allowing controlled access and length of time (time bombs) to view information.

My Health
My Health allows a person to create regimens and workouts to track daily calories lost, daily steps taken, and medications. Inside My Health, users also have Fitness Cards: Heal, Stamina and Olympian.

Heal, allows a patient to create a workout regimen based on a doctor’s plan. Stamina is for people who work out, want to keep track of their workouts and share their workouts with others. Olympian is for record breakers and the physically elite. This information is the only portion of One Med Chart shared publicly.

Fit Center
Fit Center connects smart devices and fitness platforms, such as Apple Health, Google Fit, Fitbit and iHealth.

“One Med Chart is using technology to ensure secure universal access to medical records while promoting a healthy lifestyle,” said Guillermo Vargas. “Simply put, a few minutes of uploading medical records could save someone’s life, and tracking workouts can improve a person’s life expectancy.”

The Importance of Protecting Medical Cannabis Patient Records

Seedling, Cannabis, Marijuana, CannabisAs of 2019, the voters in 33 American states have passed some form of legislation allowing the use of medical marijuana. 10 of them have gone so far as to legalize the recreational use of the drug. In late 2018, the U.S. government re-classified hemp — the subspecies of cannabis lacking significant concentrations of the compounds responsible for the psychoactive effects associated with the plant – from a controlled substance to an agricultural commodity. This change at the federal level has essentially made it legal to sell and use products containing cannabidiol, a cannabis compound used to help treat a variety of health issues and which does not induce intoxication.

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Why Your Practice Needs Electronic Health Reporting

As technology evolves and there’s more emphasis on streamlining business practices, there’s an increasing reliance on electronic health records. In 2014, private healthcare providers were required to adopt electronic medical records to maintain their existing Medicare and Medicaid reimbursement levels. The move was a part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, which aimed to improve quality, safety, efficiency and reduce health disparities.

The Act also offered financial incentives to those providers who could prove meaningful use in the adoption of electronic health reporting. Non-compliant healthcare providers faced penalties, including a 1 percent reduction in Medicare reimbursements. When it was officially mandated, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) predicted a 12 percent growth in employment opportunities from 2014 to 2024. Positions they expected to open up included medical records and health information technicians, computer systems managers, health managers and computer support specialists.

If you’re unsure about the role electronic health reporting can play in your practice, using the following information as a valuable resource. Every practice can benefit from EHR, and it’s important to understand the how and why.

Electronic Medical Records vs. Electronic Health Records

Electronic medical records and electronic health records are often used interchangeably, but there are some key differences. Medical records offer a more narrow view of an individual’s medical history, and it’s used mainly for diagnosis and treatment. They are unique to a specific practice and are not designed to be shared outside of that practice.

Electronic health records, on the other hand, show a patient’s overall history. It is a comprehensive medical chart that’s intended to be shared with other practices. It includes everything from images to allergies to lab results. If the patient were to move across state lines, their electronic medical record would follow them, while an electronic health record stays with the practices they leave behind.

Improved Efficiency and Cost Savings

Electronic health records can provide immense benefits in terms of increased efficiency. This can be demonstrated by current statistics on EHR. One survey found that 79 percent of users stated that EHR allowed their practices to run more efficiently. Of the doctors surveyed, 82 percent reported that sending prescriptions electronically saved time, 75 percent received lab results even quicker, and 70 percent reported increased data confidentiality.

Continue Reading

Why Your Practice Needs Electronic Health Reporting

As technology evolves and there’s more emphasis on streamlining business practices, there’s an increasing reliance on electronic health records. In 2014, private healthcare providers were required to adopt electronic medical records to maintain their existing Medicare and Medicaid reimbursement levels. The move was a part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, which aimed to improve quality, safety, efficiency and reduce health disparities.

The Act also offered financial incentives to those providers who could prove meaningful use in the adoption of electronic health reporting. Non-compliant healthcare providers faced penalties, including a 1 percent reduction in Medicare reimbursements. When it was officially mandated, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) predicted a 12 percent growth in employment opportunities from 2014 to 2024. Positions they expected to open up included medical records and health information technicians, computer systems managers, health managers and computer support specialists.

If you’re unsure about the role electronic health reporting can play in your practice, using the following information as a valuable resource. Every practice can benefit from EHR, and it’s important to understand the how and why.

Electronic Medical Records vs. Electronic Health Records

Electronic medical records and electronic health records are often used interchangeably, but there are some key differences. Medical records offer a more narrow view of an individual’s medical history, and it’s used mainly for diagnosis and treatment. They are unique to a specific practice and are not designed to be shared outside of that practice.

Electronic health records, on the other hand, show a patient’s overall history. It is a comprehensive medical chart that’s intended to be shared with other practices. It includes everything from images to allergies to lab results. If the patient were to move across state lines, their electronic medical record would follow them, while an electronic health record stays with the practices they leave behind.

Improved Efficiency and Cost Savings

Electronic health records can provide immense benefits in terms of increased efficiency. This can be demonstrated by current statistics on EHR. One survey found that 79 percent of users stated that EHR allowed their practices to run more efficiently. Of the doctors surveyed, 82 percent reported that sending prescriptions electronically saved time, 75 percent received lab results even quicker, and 70 percent reported increased data confidentiality.

EHR Cost Savings

There are immense cost savings associated with EHR. For example, large hospitals can save anywhere between $37 million to $59 million over a five-year period, not including incentive benefits. The majority of those savings come from the ability to eliminate various labor-intensive tasks and other paper-driven responsibilities. With better access to patient data and smart error prevention alerts, the chances of medical errors are greatly reduced. You’ll also experience easier communication across the entire medical channel. You can track electronic messages from staff to labs to other hospitals and clinicians.

Many administrative tasks are streamlined, resulting in time reduction. Filling out forms and taking care of billing requests often take up a significant portion of healthcare costs. Electronic health records also provide more information on next best steps, and can automatically siphon information that needs to be shared with various public health agencies.

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Electronic Medical Records Increase Potential Liability for Physicians

Guest post by Keith L. Klein, MD, FACP, FASN.

The use of electronic medical records (EMRs) is increasing liability risks for physicians. We have not yet seen the full impact of EMRs, because cases take three to four years to be filed from the time of the adverse event. However, we are beginning to see data that show EMRs are a contributing factor in malpractice suits.

In a study by The Doctors Company of 97 EMR-related closed claims from 2007 to 2014, user factors contributed to 64 percent of claims, while system factors contributed to the remaining 42 percent. EMRs can result in a weak defense by casting the user—the physician—in an unfavorable light.

In a recent presentation I gave at HIMSS, I outlined malpractice cases that involved EMRs that resulted in cumulative awards of more than $30 million and reviewed areas where EMRs present the greatest risks.

Risk 1: Copy-and-Paste

Copying and pasting previously entered information can perpetuate any prior mistakes or fail to document a changing clinical situation. In The Doctors Company study, 13 percent of cases involved pre-populating/copy-and-paste as a contributing factor. While it may be OK to use the copy-and-paste function to save time, whatever is pasted must also be edited to reflect the current situation. Similar to copy-and-paste is the practice of using templates. Some of the biggest pitfalls in these two functions are lack of individualized information on the patient, gender confusion, lengthy notes for each encounter that look like they have been enhanced by the computer, lots of blanks, repeated typos and other errors, and use of similar phrases sequentially.

Risk 2: Informed Consent

Physicians must take care to capture the electronic signature of the patient when loading an informed consent into the EMR. Make certain the signature is legible. Also check to be sure the scanned document is in the record and that the informed consent is documented in the notes.

The following is from a case that involved problems with informed consent in the EMR:

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Every Physician and Medical Practice Should Be Aware of These Common Risks and Safeguards for EHRs – Are You? (Part 1)

Guest post by Allan Ridings and Joseph Wager, senior risk management and patient safety specialists, Cooperative of American Physicians.

Part 1 of a two-part series.

Introducing an electronic medical records system into the practice helps the physicians and staff provide more efficient healthcare by making medical records more accessible to all health care team members. It also brings some risks. In this two-part article, CAP Risk Management and Patient Safety identifies 10 areas of risk exposure and provides some brief recommendations in each area.

EMR or EHR

Know your system.  Electronic Medical Record is the term most often used for the electronic system now holding the medical records of the physician’s patients. If patients’ medical data is shared electronically with other facilities, locations, caregivers, and/or billers, the term Electronic Health Record is more accurate. The terms are often used interchangeably. Most articles are using the words “Electronic Health Record.”

Provide updated/additional training periodically, especially after software updates and enhancements.

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What We Think When We’re Led to Think a Certain Way: Wolters Kluwer’s Survey About Healthcare and the American Uninformed

Wolters Kluwer recently released a gem of a survey fit for the bandwagon of health IT topics currently underway.

On its head, the survey results are intriguing and the data does provide some insight into what the American public is thinking when led to think a certain way about a specific topic that, quite frankly, most don’t know much about.

Now, I’m not saying Wolters Kluwer data is flawed. On the contrary, the firm, which makes its living producing qualified data, knows what it’s doing. What I’m implying is that Wolters Kluwer is producing a survey with data collected by an audience that doesn’t truly understand the topic in which it’s responding to.

Let’s dive in and I’ll explain.

According to the survey by the Philadelphia-based company, 80 percent of consumers believe the greater “consumerization” of healthcare – or the trend of individuals taking a greater and more active role in their own healthcare – is positive for Americans.

“Survey data suggests many Americans feel that a greater role in their care is not only good, but necessary, with 86 percent of consumers reporting that they feel they have to take a more proactive role in managing their own healthcare to ensure better quality of care.”

Let’s start here. As a member of the healthcare community, I’ve helped produce similar reports based on surveys I have even helped write, produce, analyze and release to the public. Does that mean my data was a good as Wolters Kluwer? No, not at all.

My point is that there is nothing new here. Nearly every survey of the American public about healthcare tends to suggest that they need to be more involved in their care. All Americans want to take greater control of their car until, seemingly, it’s time to do so.

Even the results suggest that Americans have the information and tools available to them to take on more responsibility.

“Most consumers also say they feel prepared to take on a greater role in managing their own healthcare, with 76 percent reporting that they have the information and tools to take a more proactive role in healthcare decisions ranging from choosing healthcare providers to researching treatment options. Despite feeling prepared, only 19 percent report that they have their own electronic Personal Health Record (PHR).”

Well, there’s the catch. There always something holding people back; no, it’s not the fact that when it comes time for the rubber to meet the road no one is ready to actually start their journey. If only everyone had access to a PHR, everyone would clamor to be more involved in their care.

Certainly, most of us know that this is simply an excuse so no one has to take responsibility for their actions. And, when PHRs are readily available, some other hurdle will keep Americans from moving forward with their engagement.

Finally, of the 1,000 respondents, Wolters Kluwer suggests that a mind boggling 30 percent of Americans want the same experiences with their physicians as they have with other consumer interactions, such as while shopping, traveling or lodging, complete with choices and control.

Here’s where my suspension of disbelief ceases. There’s just no simple to explain this nor is there very much credibility in the statement. The flaw in this piece of detail, in my opinion, is that we’ll never be able to have the same experiences with our physicians as we can with our travel agent or the baker in the local supermarket.

Physicians, after all, develop a much more intimate with their “consumers.” I mean, physicians see us naked and stick us with needles and get a lot closer than the clerk at your local department store. There is simply no way the relationship nor the experience is going to be the same. Which brings me back to my original point: the survey just seems to try to be so much more than it is seemingly as a result of trying to be part of a larger conversation.

But, to mitigate against the risk of you thinking I’m holding out on you, here are the remaining results. Let me know if you agree with my assessment:

According to Wolters Kluwer: “When it comes to choices about physicians, assuming that experience levels and care reputations are similar, consumers rank costs of visits and procedures (20 percent); technologically advanced offices, including the ability to communicate via email with doctors and nurses, schedule appointments online (19 percent); location of practice/office (19 percent) and friendliness of staff (14 percent) as the top four factors influencing their decision.”

Among other findings from the survey: