Tag: Citrix

Troubleshoot Issues Impacting Citrix and Epic Users

Image result for goliath technologies logoJoin Electronic Health Reporter partner Goliath Technologies on Tuesday, October 16th at 12:30 p.m. ET/9:30 a.m. PT.

During the live seminar you’ll gain the opportunity to learn more about how healthcare organizations like Monroe Healthcare, of Wisconsin, and Catholic Health Initiatives proactively use Goliath Technologies’ new Epic Module to anticipate, troubleshoot and prevent end user experience issues before Epic and Citrix users are impacted.

During the presentation, attendees will learn:

When used with Epic, the Goliath Performance Monitor provides end-to-end correlation between the key metrics System Pulse provides, the underlying Citrix or VMware infrastructure, and user experience.

Goliath Performance Monitor works with Epic to distill the Response Time Tracking (RTT) value to its component parts, such as database time, network time, system time and more, and correlates those metrics to user experience performance. As a result, Goliath can provide resource availability and performance of each of the stages and support components to better enable administrators to understand how consumption and capacity affect performance. The end-to-end view that Goliath provides, combined with the data already available from System Pulse, allows corrective action before users are impacted – whether inside Epic or in the associated systems and infrastructure.

The Goliath performance monitoring and troubleshooting suite of tools provide everything hospitals and health systems need to ensure that the mission critical applications and systems needed by healthcare professionals to perform their life-saving work are available on a consistent basis.

  1. Automatically confirm that EHR applications and IT infrastructure are available, and if they are not, use embedded intelligence and automation to alert IT so they can fix the issue before physicians and health care workers are impacted.
  2. Anticipate, troubleshoot, and prevent end user experience issues where most users experience issues: logon initiation, logon processing, and system performance.
  3. Enable IT pros to quickly remediate problems and isolate root cause to reduce professional pain.
  4. Have broad and deep visibility to issues across multiple platforms, regardless of which IT infrastructure and applications are being used and where end users are located.
  5. Provide objective evidence through historical reports and trending analysis to allow permanent fix actions to be implemented to prevent issues in the future.
  6. Are purpose-built for major EMR/EHR applications including Cerner, Allscripts, MEDITECH, and Epic.

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Thoughts and Images from HIMSS14 Day 3

DSCN1284A day removed from the chaos (and wonderment and bliss) of HIMSS14 I thought I’d provide you with some of my thoughts about my experiences at the event. First, it was a wonderful, albeit tiresome experience. I was glad, and proud, to be back.

I attended the show twice before – in 2011 and 2012 as a vendor – and this third time as a reporter. In sum, I enjoyed it much more being there as a member of the press. It was more enriching and engaging and I was able to learn more about what’s actually going on in the space.

My only regret: Not being able to connect with colleagues of mine in the blogosphere. If truth should be told, I would have liked to have personally met as many as possible. The presence of several at the show was noticeable and lively. I crossed paths with several of them, but was not actually able to shake hands and say hello. I take full responsibility. Perhaps I’m a bit shy and introverted.

However, I met many other great people and had great conversations at the show. Omnicell, Verisk Health, Allscripts, ZirMed, MedSys Group and SAS stand out. I saw some great displays and some great IT. However, there were many times in which I was bored. One vendor, for example (with what can probably be described as having the biggest social media presence on Twitter while there) did not live up to the hype, and likely needs some ongoing communication training to help its officers learn how to stay on point and drive a story home; a totally missed opportunity from this reporter’s perspective.

Overall, I tend to agree with John Lynn. I saw very little that was truly exciting and innovative; nothing that really knocked my socks off.

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