Tag: Reciprocity Labs

Healthcare Hacking Profitability and Prevention

By Ken Lynch, founder and CEO, Reciprocity Labs.

Ken Lynch

For decades now, hackers have been cashing in on financial data. The routine has been constant. A hacker finds their way into a site, steals financial information belonging to the site’s visitors then uses their personal information to create fake credit cards. These are then used to steal money from unsuspecting individuals. However, this trend hit a snag once financial institutions found ways of stopping such activities. This was frustrating to these intruders considering that most times, their efforts were rendered futile after the cards they made are blocked.

These people then discovered a new cash cow that allows them to reap money from insurance companies. Typically, hackers get as little as $1 for one credit card, which is a meager payment for such a dangerous job. However, healthcare information pays well in that they create counterfeit health insurance cards, then make cash claims in fabricated hospitals. Considering that the demand for this data is high, healthcare data attacks have been on the rise, targeting several hospitals, and they have managed to affect over 11 million people.

How do you keep your data safe from these online breaches?

With such high stakes, each hospital needs to come up with security measures that ensure their data is always safe. Look at some of the possible ways you can secure your information.

Asses the risks

You cannot solve a problem if you are not aware that it even exists in the first place. Check for loopholes that leave your hospital vulnerable to these attacks. For instance, a hospital with few employees leaves specific sectors such as the IT section unmanned, which makes them susceptible to being attacked. You must approach this by looking at the most sensitive areas of a company and find out the consequences that you may face if your data is stolen.

Appraise all agreement with business partners, vendors and client every year

Know the type of information that the people and entities you interact with access. Learn what your contract entails and review the speculations regularly. Long before new laws were formed, third-party companies never had any agreements with any of their partners. Whenever they got a hold of information, it was up to them to know what they wanted to do with such intel. In this era, such loopholes can lead to massive scandals, which is why you need to evaluate every past action and put stringent measures to ensure anyone who encounters sensitive information knows the implications of going against the agreement. Do not give a lot of authority to vendors and ensure that they sign privacy policies that bar them from sharing or using private data.

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Penalties For Violating HIPAA

By Ken Lynch, founder and CEO, Reciprocity Labs.

Ken Lynch

If your organization handles protected health information (PHI) or electronic Protected Health Information (ePHI), you should be well aware of the Healthcare Insurance Portability and Accountability Act known commonly as HIPAA. The HIPAA compliance is regulated by the federal government and failure to comply with it can attract penalties. Additionally, non-compliance may have severe consequences!

What are the penalties for HIPAA non-compliance?

Congress enacted HIPAA in 1996 with the primary intention of safeguarding sensitive information as people switched jobs. Additionally, the United States’ Department of Health and Human Services (HSS) established HIPAA Privacy Rule in 2003.

The privacy rule defines PHI as any information handled by a covered entity that concerns the health, treatment, or payment information associated with an individual. As technology related crimes increased, HIPAA focused on ePHI where they created three safeguards in 2005. They include:

Definition of covered entities and business associates

According to HIPAA, covered entities are all the bodies that are involved in the handling of a patient’s data. They include healthcare providers such as clinicians, doctors, nurses, pharmacists, dentists, and chiropractors as well as all healthcare plans providers such as the HMOs, health assurance entities, and government programs.

HIPAA also considers all healthcare clearinghouses as covered entities that should comply with its regulations. These bodies process nonstandard health-data that they obtain from the covered entities to transform it into standard data.

Business associates are all the institutions that can access the PHI or ePHI since they are contracted by the covered entities to execute specific activities on their behalf. HIPAA demands that your organization have a written contract that elaborates the responsibility of the business associates in upholding the integrity and confidentiality of the PHI that they handle.

Governing of HIPAA

The privacy and security regulations by HIPAA are enforced by the Office for Civil Rights (OCR) which serves under the Department of Health and Human Services (HSS). OCR provides a platform where you can air your complaints against covered entities as well as their business associates. If you feel that there is a data breach, you should visit the OCR website and submit your claims there for evaluation. Alternatively, you can use their portal, mail, fax, or email services.

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HIPAA Violations, How to Prevent Them

By Ken Lynch, founder and CEO, Reciprocity Labs.

Ken Lynch

The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) applies to all companies in the United States. Healthcare providers, covered entities and their business associates should understand HIPAA and take compliance steps to avoid monetary fines and even prison time. HIPAA violations in the workplace can occur in any organization but especially those that provide healthcare benefits to their employees or require health information to process disability benefits or workplace compensation.

Understanding HIPAA violations in the workplace

HIPAA was enacted in 1996 and aimed to protect the health information of individuals as they moved from one job to another. Since then, the Act has been refined to include more coverage and protections.

In 2003, the Privacy Rule, which defines Protected Health Information (PHI), was passed by the US Department of Health and Human Services. In 2005, HIPAA was updated with the Security Rule, which focuses on electronically stored PHI (ePHI). Today, employers must adhere to HIPAA and related regulations, including the Security Rule and the Privacy Rule, as required by industry regulators and the federal government.

What information qualifies as PHI or ePHI

The Privacy Rule defines PHI as any health information that concerns the payment of healthcare, provision of healthcare or health status of an individual, which is held by a covered entity.

In the workplace, any employee health plans or medical records that are collected by the employer for the purposes of administering healthcare plans are PHI or ePHI information. Health information that is gathered but not intended for use in administering healthcare plans is not considered PHI or ePHI.

When an employee provides health information to document workers’ compensation or sick leave, the information is not considered PHI or ePHI. On the other hand, if you contact an employee’s healthcare provider, the information that the provider will give you falls under the Privacy Rule. Employment records do not fall under PHI or ePHI even they may include health-related information.

What HR should know about HIPAA

If your organization offers employees a covered health plan, it’s critical to determine whether you need to be HIPAA compliant.

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12 Steps For Agile Compliance Management

By Ken Lynch, founder, Reciprocity Labs.

Ken Lynch

Agile companies do things faster and efficiently. In agile development, lean startup models apply agile methods to build high-quality systems that meet any industry, regulatory and other relevant standards such as HIPAA and remain “audit ready.”

Agile companies focus on quick wins, external focus, ruthless prioritization, and continuous development. Agile development relies heavily on constant testing to ensure improvement.

Agile compliance management

Lean development refers to a set of principles that are designed to eliminate waste, build-in quality, create knowledge, deliver fast results, defer commitment, respect people and optimize the whole process. At their core, both agile and lean development focus on efficiency, sustainability, speed, quality and communication.

Companies can deliver software faster when they eliminate inefficient processes. Agile development follows the following 12 principles:

 How Agile development applies to cybersecurity

Agile development methods align well to cybersecurity because they focus on harnessing change, readjustment and reflection. You see, malicious actors (think black hat hackers) have excelled in agile development. They continuously re-adjust their attacks to maintain superiority and remain one step ahead of defensive mechanisms employed by organizations by improving the quality of their software. To combat these threats, you need to come up with a similar agile security-first approach to protect your information and systems.

What is Agile compliance?

Agile compliance also focuses on the 12 principles of agile development; however, it focuses on threat mitigation and not product development. Furthermore, agile compliance prioritizes customer data security as well as stakeholder satisfaction as the primary product as opposed to customer satisfaction, which is the main focus of agile development.

When it comes to cybersecurity governance, risk and compliance (GRC), data integrity and availability leads to customer satisfaction and confidence. With compliance’s security-first approach, you create an iterative process that includes mitigation, monitoring, and review, which is aligned with your controls and protects your data.

In cybersecurity, an agile compliance program is a security-first strategy that is put in place to protect data. This strategy focuses on your data controls’ quality and ensures that even when industry regulations and standards lag behind threat vectors, your company maintains a secure data environment. Here are the 12 principles: 

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