HIPAA Risks Associated with Using Tools Like Skype During Patient Communication

Skype and unbridled communication between caregivers and their patients has opened a great many opportunities for care to be offered the world round, from a variety of locations within our own communities to remote and unconventional places in other areas of the world.

In a nutshell, Dr. DeShan spends several months in Russia each year leading an international medical mission where he serves some of Moscow’s most needy, as well as delivers care to some of the world’s remote people through journeys into the wilderness.

When he’s in Moscow serving patients, she’s able to stay connected to his practice in Midland Texas, where he’s a partner at a thriving OBGYN. Aside from relinquishing a few of his daily duties, such as delivering, he’s able to maintain a full patient load and he does that in part using the web and tools like Skype to maintain contact with them and with his practice.

Personally, I believe the work DeShan is doing is fascinating. He’s using his talent and skill to follow his passion and his calling in life. His practice and his patients are in support of his work and in no way does he keep it from them. Those patients that were not comfortable with interacting with him part time through the web were assigned to other practitioners.

However, I’ve always wondered if Skype is a tool that can be trusted for such work. Despite his good deeds, I always wondered he’s in HIPAA compliance.

According to a recent article in Medical Office Today, I’m not the only one. According to the article, “Notwithstanding the fact that Skype is ubiquitous, its use may be inappropriate for healthcare providers as web-based platforms raise a number of significant HIPAA privacy and security issues:

Also, according to the piece, HIPAA and its resulting regulations pertaining to privacy and security require covered entities such as healthcare providers to protect the confidentiality of protected health information and guard against unauthorized access, use, and disclosure of such information.

Among other things, the HIPAA rules require:

“The use of web-based platforms, especially those that are proprietary, makes it difficult for healthcare entities to meet many of their HIPAA obligations,” the article states. “As a consequence, telehealth providers carry a higher risk of potentially violating HIPAA rules when they use services such as Skype.

According to the Health Information and Trust Alliance, the organization recommends against the use of Skype and similar platforms for communications involving health information, concluding that web-based platforms are not secure, and are an inappropriate way by which to communicate with patients, especially when the communication involves health information. Their view was confirmed late last year when a security flaw was discovered in Skype that put users’ personal information at risk of disclosure.

“All of this does not mean a healthcare professional should not use Skype to communicate to patients, only that they be aware of the increased risk of violating HIPAA and think long and hard prior to using such technology.”

However, should a provider insist on using Skype, there are some steps they should consider to better protect themselves from potential HIPAA liability (all good tips, according to the magazine):

Only HIPAA-compliant technologies can truly protect a physician and a patient. These steps may help. In the long run, though, as I’m sure Dr. DeShan would agree, don’t let the cost of the work keep you from doing it.