Tag: Seema Verma

Remarks by CMS Administrator Seema Verma at the HIMSS18 Conference

Seema Verma
Seema Verma

Thank you Jared (Kushner) for that kind introduction. It has been an honor to work alongside visionaries like you; somebody who really understands at a very personal level as I do, the need and potential of innovation to better serve Americans. Having the Office of American Innovation involved is critical, and I’m grateful for Jared’s involvement, his hard work, and his leadership. It’s an honor to serve with him, and I am grateful for his service to our country.

It is a privilege to be with you here today and speak about the amazing advancements happening all across the nation in healthcare. One of the most exciting parts about being the CMS Administrator is the opportunity to see the cutting-edge breakthroughs that are happening every day. As we walk the exhibit hall of this conference, it is easy to be struck by how innovation is accelerating in healthcare.

We have procedures that we couldn’t have imagined a generation ago that are saving thousands of lives.

And it doesn’t stop with traditional healthcare innovators. The automobile industry is partnering with leading technology companies to perfect driver-less cars that may one day give independence to our nation’s elderly and people with disabilities. And through smart phones and wear-able technology, we are compiling health information every second, and Americans are using that information to track activity, calories, and heart rates. Innovators are even developing ways to monitor chronic illness with electronic watches. The list of innovation is endless.

But while all of this technology is changing every area of our lives, we face enormous challenges in healthcare, and the value that we are receiving for the amount of money that is being spent.

Last year CMS released a report showing that the rate of growth in healthcare spending is not slowing down. Despite all of the changes and regulations over the past decade, healthcare continues to grow more quickly than the overall economy. By 2026, we will be spending one in every $5 on healthcare.

This matters to each and every one of us because this increase in spending will continue to crowd out funding for other priorities, such as roads and schools, as well as national defense. Not to mention it means higher healthcare spending for each and every one of us. We’ve already seen our costs go up, with health insurance premiums, co-pays and deductibles.

And yet, this national increase in spending has not addressed many of America’s healthcare challenges. Entire communities have been ravaged by the opioid epidemic, and we rank poorly compared to other countries when it comes to preventing premature births, infant mortality and chronic diseases. It’s clear that when it comes to the most consequential measures of health and wellness, we need to get much more for our money.

The system we have is unsustainable, and it cannot continue. And President Trump agrees.

Last year, the President announced an Executive Order: Promoting Healthcare Choice and Competition Across the United States. Through his executive order the President made clear that he wants his administration working to change the rate of growth of healthcare spending so that competition can be fostered in healthcare markets, so that patients, and the American people, may receive better value for our investment in healthcare.

Secretary Azar and I are working for competition and better value by moving away from a fee-for-service approach, to a system that is value-based – and that rewards value over volume. This means paying providers on the outcomes they achieve, making people healthier rather than how many procedures they perform. Now many of you have heard this all before.

But, I’ve always been struck by how seldom the patient is mentioned in discussions around value-based care. Let me be clear, we will not achieve value-based care until we put the patient at the center of our healthcare system. Until patients can make their own decisions based on quality and value health care costs will continue to grow at an unsustainable rate. This administration is dedicated to putting patients first, to be empowered consumers of health care that have the information they need to be engaged and active decision-makers in their care. Through this empowerment, there will be a competitive advantage for providers that deliver coordinated, quality care, at the best value, to attract patients who are shopping for value.

I have spent a lot of time talking to Americans from all walks of life, and they are demanding more accountability from the health care system. As they are paying more through higher premiums and higher deductibles, they want to know how much services are going to cost, and they want to shop around for the best price. They don’t want to be paying for duplicate tests, or unnecessary care, and they are demanding a higher level of service and efficiency from the healthcare system.

In every other area of our lives, we are receiving better services that leverage innovation in technology. We can take our ATM card to any bank across the globe, and that bank can access our accounts. We can track every credit card purchase, and every phone carrier honors our cell phone number, and we receive ads for products we were only thinking about buying – or so it may seem.

So it should be no surprise that Americans have the same consumer friendly demands for healthcare. Americans are demanding that when they go to the doctor, the doctor spends more time with them, and less time on paperwork or typing into a computer.

To that end, in our drive towards value-based care, CMS adopted an approach that we call “Patients Over Paperwork.” Patients Over Paperwork is a direct result of President Trump’s Cut the Red Tape initiative, which aims to restore patients as the priority of everything we do, and eliminate burdensome regulations that have outlived their purpose.

We have held meetings in cities across America, and received thousands of letters. And one of the most common complaints we have heard from both patients and providers has been the inefficiency of Electronic Health Records – or EHRs, and the inability of providers to effectively coordinate care for their patients.

Now tremendous progress has been made in the adoption of EHRs. The technology for data sharing has advanced, and data is often shared effectively within a given healthcare system, with inpatient and outpatient doctors in the same provider system able to share and edit the same clinical record.

Despite this progress, it is extremely rare for different provider systems to be able to share data. In most cases there is not yet a business case for doing that – it’s in the financial interest of the provider systems to hold on to the data for their patients.

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