7 Healthcare Apps Every Medical Professional Needs

Guest post by Cassie Phillips, an online security blogger, who writes about the best Internet privacy apps.

Cassie Phillips
Cassie Phillips

App technology is revolutionizing the world. The sudden rise to popularity of the smartphone and tablet has put more power in our hands and more information at our fingertips than ever before. This has opened up a world of opportunities in many different fields, and medicine is no exception to that rule.

For health professionals, the vast quantity of ever-changing knowledge required to do the job properly has always been one of the most trying elements of the work. Now, there are many apps available that allow quick and easy access to a wealth of information at the push of a button. Here are just seven of the many offered.


Designed and brought to you by the creators of WebMD, this app has been hailed as one of the best for reference and diagnosis assistance. Available for free download for both Android and iOS, it is an incredible tool with many features including drug identification and information, in depth patient care tutorials, disease and condition referencing and up-to-date medical education courses. This app is a vital medical resource for medical students and professionals alike and has a huge part to play in the electronic modernization of healthcare.

3D4 Medical

This clever piece of software allows you to explore anatomy like never before. With intricate on-screen models of all parts and elements of human anatomy, this is a valuable tool that gives healthcare professionals a chance to take a look inside the body. It’s completely anatomically accurate and uses impressive 3D technology.

Alongside this, it has features to customize body parts and add labels, which makes it a perfect assistant for keeping track of cases. It also offers tutorials and introductory anatomy lessons, which are great for medical students or anyone wanting to refresh their knowledge.


When working in healthcare, it’s not just the patients that you have to worry about. All treatments come at a cost and as much as many of us would like that not to be the case, it’s a fact that isn’t going to change anytime soon. Trying to balance treatment costs can be a nightmare but ReferralMD is a great app that cuts your budget dramatically through one simple idea—optimizing referral communication. By moving all referrals to this app, a vast amount of money is saved through paper and fax machine expenses. It also ensures immediate processing of the request, which avoids handling costs.

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ResearchKit: A Valuable tool for Researchers, but with Limitations

Guest post by Kalisha Narine, technical architect, Medullan.

Kalisha Narine
Kalisha Narine

In March 2015, Apple announced the next big thing for the scientific community: ResearchKit. According to Apple, the new application would help researchers gather more data, more frequently, and more accurately than ever before, all by utilizing the more than 94 million iPhones in use in the U.S. today as a strategized recruitment channel.

In a nutshell, ResearchKit makes it easier for researchers to create iOS apps for their own research, focusing on three key things: consent, surveys, and active tasks. ResearchKit provides communication and instruction for the study, in addition to pre-built templates for surveys that can be used to collect Patient Reported Outcomes. Plus, ResearchKit can collect sensor data (objective patient activated outcomes) on fitness, voice, steps, and more, all working seamlessly within Apple’s HealthKit API, too, which many users have on their devices already. This allows researchers to access relevant health and fitness data (passive patient outcomes).

ResearchKit-powered apps like MyHeart Counts, Share the Journey, Asthma Health, GlucoSuccess and mPower have shown us that people want to do their part in advancing medical research by sharing their data with researchers committed to making life-changing discoveries that benefit us all.

Five months after its launch, I’d say, in no exaggerated terms, that ResearchKit has proven to be game-changing for researchers, leapfrogging patient reported outcome studies into a “mobile first” world. However, the current framework certainly doesn’t cover the full gamut of what is needed to build a patient-centered, engaging, scaleable digital outcomes solution. If you’re planning piloting a solution around ResearchKit, here’s what you need to know:

ResearchKit offers up important benefits for medical researchers, especially when it comes to recruitment capability and the speed at which researchers can acquire insightful data to speed medical progress.

The MyHeart Counts app has been arguably the most successful example of ResearchKit use to date — it’s a great example of the recruitment capabilities provided by ResearchKit. In just 24 hours, the researchers from MyHeart Counts were able to enroll more than 10,000 patients in the study. Then they clocked an unprecedented 41,000 consented participants in less than six months (even before entering UK and Hong Kong markets). As most researchers know, recruitment can be one of the biggest challenges in building a study. But with ResearchKit, scientists are able to grow their number of participants into the thousands very quickly; it would have taken the MyHeart Counts researchers a year and 50 medical centers around the country to get to 10,000 participants.

Additionally, ResearchKit also increases the speed at which researchers are able to find the insights they’re looking for. This is mostly because people use their mobile devices constantly (most Americans clock more than two hours per day), which means that the accumulation of mass amounts of subjective (surveys), objective (sensors/active tasks) and passive (background) data happens quickly. The Asthma Health app is a great example of this, as it combines data from a phone’s GPS with information about a city’s air quality and a patient’s outcomes data, all to help patients adhere to their treatment plans and avoid asthma triggers — study participants told researchers that the app was also helping them better understand and manage their condition. The app is also assisting providers in making personalized asthma-care recommendations.

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Mobile Health Technologies Changing Healthcare

Mobile health technologies have been on the rise for quite some time, with the number of health and fitness apps doubling over the last two years, these tools are becoming a part of our daily lives. Health apps can do everything from monitoring sleep patterns to diagnosing diseases, while other evolving technologies are paving the way for a seamless patient care experience via online patient records. An expansive infographic by the Adelphi Healthcare Informatics Master’s Degree program that follows details these important technologies.

In the beginnings of 2014, almost 50 million Americans were using health and fitness apps to monitor their behaviors. Among their most important reasons for doing so are keeping track of personal goals, staying on top of health issues, and gaining motivation. The ability to track and improve eating and exercise habits has only scratched the surface; as more and more people hop on board, the technologies will continue to get better and better.

Beyond the health and wellness applications of mobile health technologies are the value of mobile diagnoses. There are mobile technologies for diagnosing issues with the eyes, for diagnosing malaria and thyroid conditions and screening for oral lesions. These and other technologies have a wide range of applications and will only become more useful as remote areas and countries gain more access to them.

Reviewing test results online, scheduling appointments and requesting medication refills are just some of the capabilities that come along with the evolution of online patient records. Being able to interact with records and doctors in real time from miles away has the potential to revolutionize the way that the healthcare industry functions. Not only does this improve communication, but it also saves time and removes barriers that can crop up along a patient’s medical journey.

The possibilities for keeping track of health and wellness, improving the ability to make diagnoses around the world, and accessing patient records from anywhere are what make mobile health technologies exciting.

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